Welcome to the McNair Research Scholars Program

An image of the 2020-2022 McNair Cohort taken over Zoom.
2020-22 Cohort: Samantha Mazariegos, Cindy Berganza, Sebastian Figueroa, Edwin Zamora, Luis Godinez, Andrea Macias, Abel Aragon, Reno Garcia, Stephanie Martinez, Brittany Jasper, Cristian Hernandez, Alicia López, Ruby Gordillo, and Jessika Viveros.

An image of the 2019 - 2021 McNair Cohort standing besides each other outside.

2019-2021 Cohort: Brian Zamora, Kristal Orta Martinez, Sara Moya, Brenda Garcia, Ayuni Kelton, Jazmin Perez Saldana, Julio Mena Bernal, Rogelio Bazan-Flores, Rosamari Orduña, Princess Udeh, Eugene McAdoo, Mia Glionna, Fatiatama’i Folau and Michael Delos Santos. 

About The Program

The UCLA McNair Research Scholars Program was established at UCLA in 2003 as a two-year research-based intensive program that prepares undergraduate students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. to apply to and excel in the best graduate school programs in the country.

Each year, the program maintains a cohort of 28 juniors and seniors from a variety of majors in the Humanities, Arts, Social Sciences, STEM, and applied or interdisciplinary Sciences. The UCLA McNair program particularly attracts young scholars who are committed to social change and who use scholarship and research as a means to achieve social justice. Hence, the program’s motto to “Transform the Academy.” Additionally, UCLA McNair Alumni work in a variety of professional positions that advance a social justice agenda.

» Download McNair Scholars Program Brochure

Program Curriculum:

UCLA McNair Research Scholars complete a comprehensive and rigorous two-year academic program under the supervision of the Program Director, the Assistant Director, and multiple Graduate Student Mentors.

During their first year in the program, McNair Scholars participate in the UCLA Student Research Program (SRP) under the guidance of a faculty mentor, and attend weekly seminars designed specifically for the program. These seminars guide students through navigating the academy and developing research proposals.

In the summer between their first and second year in the program, McNair Scholars participate in the six-week UCLA McNair Summer Research Institute. This six-week program includes: workshops and seminars on academic career opportunities; standardized test preparation; writing and research skills; writing a statement of purpose; obtaining letters of recommendation; and completing the graduate school application process. In addition, McNair Scholars begin their independent research projects and present their current findings at the UCLA Summer Symposium.

During their second year in the program, McNair Scholars apply to graduate school and complete, present, and publish their research project and senior thesis. Every Scholar has the opportunity to donate her or his research materials and senior thesis to the Southern California Library.

»View McNair Two-Year Plan

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Abel Aragon

Abel Aragon

Geology, Chicana/o/x and Central American Studies Minor

Research Interests: Paleoclimatology, Paleothermometry, Geochemistry, Climate Change, and Geology.

Cindy Berganza

Cindy Berganza

Psychology, Political Science

Research Interests: Race, Politics, Psychology, Law, and Immigration.

Sebastian Figueroa

Sebastian Figueroa

Astrophysics

Research Interests: Plasma, Interferometry, Mathematical Physics, and Cosmology.

Reno Garcia

Reno Garcia

Sociology, Education Studies Minor

Research Interests: Agricultural Labor, Economic Injustice, Mental Health, and Empowerment and Community.

Luis Godinez

Luis Godinez

Political Science, Public Affairs

Research Interests: Mental Health, Identity, Transfronterizo, Academia, and Education.

Ruby Gordillo

Ruby Gordillo

English

Research Interests: Diversity, Education, Chicanx, Change, and Inclusion.

Cristian Hernandez

Cristian Hernandez

Sociology, Chicana/o/x and Central American Studies Minor

Research Interests: Immigration, Asylum, Mental Health, Central America, and Unaccompanied Minors.

Brittany Jasper

Brittany Jasper

Sociology, African-American Studies and Education Studies Minor

Research Interests: Special Education, Black, Equity, and Racial Profiling.

Alicia López

Alicia López

Sociology, Chicana/o/x and Central American Studies Minor

Research Interests: Immigration, Gender, Race, Neighborhood Change, and COVID-19.

Andrea Macias

Andrea Macias

Psychology

Research Interests: Parenting Students, Education, Self-efficacy, and Relationships.

Stephanie Martinez

Stephanie Martinez

History, Chicana/o/x and Central American Studies

Research Interests: Indigenous, Mesoamerica, History, Colonialism, and Pre-Conquest/Contact.

Samantha Mazariegos

Samantha Mazariegos

Human Biology and Society, Global Health Minor

Research Interests: Mental Health, Trauma, Immigration, Central America, and U.S Immigration Policy.

Jessika Viveros

Jessika Viveros

Political Science

Research Interests: Labor Studies, White Supremacy, Police Brutality, Black, and Abolition.

Edwin Zamora

Edwin Zamora

Psychology, Applied Developmental Psychology and Education Studies Minor

Research Interests: Early Bilingual Education, and Early Childhood Education.

To RSVP to any of the Events and Workshops below, please use the AAP Graduate Mentoring Workshops Registration Form.

Eligibility Criteria

>> Applications open Fall Quarter 2021. <<

Students must meet one of the following criteria:

  • Be a low-income AND first generation college student
    OR
  • Be a member of an underrepresented group within graduate education

Students must also:

  • Be a United States citizen or permanent resident
  • Be a currently enrolled UCLA undergraduate student
  • Be a third-year or a transfer student who has completed between 90 and 175 units by Fall of the application year
  • Demonstrate academic potential for graduate study
  • Be available during the McNair Summer Research Institute (typically Summer Session A)

Graduate Mentors and Student Staff

Nayelie Benitez Santos

Junior Cohort Mentor

e: nbenitezsantos@college.ucla.edu

Kayla Boyden

Senior Cohort Mentor

e: kboyden@college.ucla.edu

Salvador Herrera

Junior Cohort Mentor

e: sherrera@college.ucla.edu

Kristal Orta Martinez

Peer Mentor

e: kortamartinez@college.ucla.edu

Wanda Quintanilla Duran

Junior Cohort Mentor

e: wquintanilladuran@college.ucla.edu

Janet Rivera

Peer Mentor

e: jrivera@college.ucla.edu

Staff

Alice Ho, Ph.D.

Director

e: aho@college.ucla.edu

Liliana Islas, Ph.D.

Assistant Director

e: lislas@college.ucla.edu

or

mcnair@college.ucla.edu

Sandra Brukardt

Office Coordinator

e: sbrukardt@college.ucla.edu

As part of UCLA’s Undergraduate Research Week, the McNair Graduating Class of 2021 will be presenting their work at the McNair Senior Research Presentations on May 26th at 9am-4pm.

The UCLA McNair Research Scholars Program is a two-year research-based intensive program that prepares undergraduate students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. to apply to and excel in the best graduate school programs in the country. Each of the Scholars have been working with a faculty advisor on their thesis and are excited to share their findings with everyone.

Full event details are available in the McNair 2021 Senior Presentations Program Book

Join us via Zoom by clicking on the following link: https://bit.ly/urwmcnair2021

Please see the schedule and presenter’s bios below.

2021 McNair Senior Presentations Schedule

May 26th 2021
Zoom: https://bit.ly/urwmcnair2021

9:00am-9:10am — Welcome

Alice Ho, Ph.D. – McNair Director          

                                                                  

9:10am-10:30am — Racialized and Gendered Representations of the Contemporary   

Popolo, Meauli, Uliuli: Addressing Anti-Blackness in Samoan Americans

Fatiatama’i Folau

Divas and Deviants: The Sexualized Image-Making of Black Women Rappers in Vibe Magazine

Mia Glionna

“Black Students Do the Real Work!”: Maintaining Mental Health Among Black College Students at UCLA

Odinakachukwu Princess Udeh

The Male Gaze in The Workplace: The Color Red’s Effect on Men’s Perception of Woman’s Attractiveness and Hireability

Ayuni Kelton

10:30 am-11:00am — Break

11:00am-12:00pm — Transnational Socialities Beyond Borders

Migration and Arts Activism: Narratives from Mexico and Border Art

Brenda Garcia

Paqueterias: Transnationalism for Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles

Sara Moya

Legal Policies and Engagements in the Cold War That Affected Developing Nations

Michael Delos Santos

12:00pm- 1:15pm — Lunch

1:15pm-2:35pm — Students of Color Belonging and Development

Investigating Disparities in Service, Education, and Healthcare Impacting Latinx Autistic Communities

Kristal Orta Martinez

Addressing the Institutional Detriments of Health and its Effects on Minority Health Professionals When Dealing with Medical “Burnout”

Rogelio Bazan-Flores

Revisiting Morphology of Ocean Sunfish & Phylogenetic Placement

Rosamari Orduna

Understanding Existing Mental Health Disparities within Latinx Students and its intersection with COVID-19

Julio Mena Berna

2:35-2:45pm — Break

2:45pm- 3:45pm — College Access and Critical Methodologies

English-Learner and Non-English Learner Postsecondary School Enrollment Rates in Select California High Schools

Jazmin Perez

Taking Flight from the Burning House: Exploring Antiblackness and Educational Fugitivity in the Experiences of Black Participants of a Social Justice College Access Program

Eugene McAdoo

Indigenous in Me: Exploring Nemachtili in Freirean and Critical Indigenous Methodologies

Brian Zamora

 

3:45pm — Closing Remarks

Fatiatama’i Folau

Fatiatama’i Folau

“Popolo, Meauli, Uliuli: Addressing Anti-Blackness in Samoan Americans"

My encounter with my family in Samoa opened my eyes to the pervasive nature of Anti-Blackness. As I grew darker, I was teased for being a "loli," a Samoan term for black sea cucumber, a verbal parachute that according to Bonilla Silva signals Blackness. In solidarity with Black Lives Matter, this project entitled “Popolo, Meauli ,Uliuli ‘’ aims to address anti-Black attitudes and sentiments in Samoan American communities. This project is an attempt to understand the cultural positionality of “Fa’aSamoa ’’ in Samoans Americans in context to race and ethnicity. This research asks: How does anti-blackness reflect in the larger Pasifika across the diaspora? How are racial understandings about the Black community understood within the first and second generational Samoan American Aiga? Where does the Samoan configuration, “Fa’asamoa, fa’amasinoga, and fa’aloalo” (Samoan way, identity and respect) lie within the spectrum of race? Using an interdisciplinary lens borrowing from Critical Race Theory, Bonilla Silva concepts of “racial distancing, social contact, tri racial hierarchy” and Pacific Islander Indigenous epistemology I attempt to holistically address and assess this matter. Through facilitated ethnographies, our findings concluded the intergenerational variations categorized in Afakasi, Military, Samoa Churches and Transnational Relationships. The voyage towards reconciliation and Black solidarity remains in a state of progression, nevertheless moving forward.

Mia Glionna

Mia Glionna

“Divas and Deviants: The Sexualized Image-Making of Black Women Rappers in Vibe Magazine”

Established in 1993, Vibe magazine played a crucial role in the mainstreaming of rap and hip hop culture in the United States. Considering their massive influence in the industry, I hope to explore how articles of this magazine use the sexualized imagery of Black women rappers. Vinita Srivastava claims that the magazine’s infamous sexy cover pages “reproduced patriarchalimagery of African American women, yet… indicate a conscious desire to disrupt such images”
(57) Even when trying to unravel stereotypes, Black feminine hypersexuality is still recognized by the magazine as an invaluable tool to attract readership and sales. To explore her claim further, my project asks 1) How are images of Black female rappers’ sexuality framed in early 2000s Vibe magazines? and 2) Does Vibe’s sexualized representation of Black female rappers liberate or constrict them? Part 1 examines the respectability politics behind Missy Elliott’s representation in “Freaky Tales” (Vibe 2001). Part 2 explores the ways in which stereotypes against Black women have persisted in the characterization of Trina in “Wild for the Night,” (Vibe 2002). In these analyses, I hope to compare and contrast the way their sexualized images were constructed and assess whether these articles were successful in subverting stereotypes about their respective artists.

Odinakachukwu Princess Udeh

Odinakachukwu Princess Udeh

“’Black Students Do the Real Work!”: Maintaining Mental Health Among Black College Students at UCLA’”

Black college students deal with academic, social, and racial stressors that come from the racism and discrimination they experience at Predominantly White Institutions (PWI). Mental health care resources are universally available at UCLA; however, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), the primary resource, is a mental health hub for 33,000+ students at UCLA. For this study, I aim to provide a glimpse into how Black college students at UCLA view CAPS and utilize Black-run campus organizations such as the Afrikan Student Union (ASU) to create their own “safe space.” Through 84 survey responses and 10 virtual interviews, I found that Black college students do not utilize the counseling resources on university campuses because they are unwelcoming. Although the UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services generally caters to all university students, Black college students do not utilize counseling resources because there is a lack of culturally trained psychologists or Black psychologists available to discuss the imposter syndrome, microaggressions, and racism Black students experience. As a result, Black students take on the role of community organizers. Through the creation and maintenance of the Afrikan Student Union and other Black-run campus organizations, Black students create safe spaces and provide race-based resources for themselves to maintain retention within their community. My research reiterates that the responsibility taken on by Black students should be the job of the university, especially when they praise themselves for diversity and inclusion.

Ayuni Kelton

Ayuni Kelton

“The Male Gaze in The Workplace: The Color Red’s Effect on Men’s Perception of Woman’s Attractiveness and Hireability

Elliot and Maier have stated that the color red facilitates approach and avoidance motivated behaviors depending on context (2012). Approach behaviors are seen through the biological perspective in the reddening of faces during ovulation and then ingrained socially with associations of red and romance. Avoidance behaviors are biologically displayed in red faces when expressing anger and red is socially conditioned as a sign of danger. This study examines red in the workplace, which is a context where one’s abilities and one’s appearance are evaluated and could promote avoidance related behaviors and approach related behaviors. This study intends to question if the color red affects heterosexual male participant’s perceptions of a female’s attractiveness, measured by sexual intent, and intelligence, measured by hirability, in the workplace. Research of this kind has value as women make up a larger percent of the workforce than men yet hold a disproportionately small number of positions in upper management and are paid less than men. This study hypothesizes that men will present avoidance behaviors in the response to intelligence and approach behaviors in the response to attraction when viewing women in the workplace. This study used an experimental between-subjects design where subjects participated in evaluating a female’s intelligence and attraction in one of three color conditions by completing an online survey.

Brenda Garcia

Brenda Garcia

“Migration and Arts Activism: Narratives from Mexico and Border Art”

Over the past decade, the number of Central American refugees attempting to migrate to the United States through Mexico has dramatically increased. The rapid shift in climate change increased gang warfare and violence has forcibly displaced individuals from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. With the goal of achieving a deeper understanding of U.S.- Mexico border policies in contemporary society, this project explores how artists amplify the mounting refugee crisis through the use of creativity to attract viewers, create a sense of unity within communities and cultivate curiosity. Primarily, this research focuses on the power of arts activism in promoting social issues through the lens of U.S.-Mexico border art installations. Artists included in this analysis of transborder arts activism are JR, the art collective Postcommodity, Ronald Rael, and Virginia San Fratello. To further support the research, I look at statistics offered by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), interviews with migrants, and image analysis of installation works. By probing deeper into U.S.-Mexico border policies and the role that the arts play in fostering conversation and activism, I further explore the power behind arts activism.

Sara Moya

Sara Moya

“Paqueterias: Transnationalism for Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles”

Paqueterias is the Spanish word for parcels. But in Mexican immigrant communities, paqueterias are courier services that transport goods from Mexico to the United States and vice versa. These courier services transport goods like chiles, homemade ceramics, and medicines through commercial airlines for Mexican migrants living in Los Angeles. Studies of transnationalism have focused on the visits migrants make to their home countries, often bringing with them gifts or social remittances which are ideas, norms, values, and practices (Itzigsohn, 1999; Levitt, 1998). These studies have focused on migrants who form familial, social, economic, and political relationships through their visits to their countries, leaving those who default this benchmark to remain absent. This project seeks to address these shortcomings by analyzing the use of paqueterias by Mexican migrants in Los Angeles, many of whom are undocumented and unable to travel across borders effectively. Through in-depth interviews with paqueteria users and owners to learn about the sending and receiving dynamics of paqueterias, it is hypothesized that paqueterias are central to shaping transnationalism for Mexican migrants who cannot travel as they enable cross-border movement for these migrants. In sum, this project illustrates the importance of shifting away from transnationalism studies that exclusively focus on the transborder movement of migrants who possess legal status and can therefore easily travel across borders. It also offers an underexplored window into Mexican immigrants’ transnational lives and into paqueterias that have facilitated transnationalism for Mexican immigrants.

Michael Delos Santos

Michael Delos Santos

“Legal Policies and Engagements in the Cold War That Affected Developing Nations”

The conflicts that emerged from both Asia and Europe and the legal policies that were created drove the United States to want to become the police keeper internationally, leading to the lesser-explored various interventions by the United States in other countries. Between 1945 -1975 the United States advocated the spread of democracy and increased political influence. This research study examines pivotal US military actions and interventions, doctrines, and legal policies to reappraise these notions of western influence. As the United States rose to status of global superpower, it was rivaled by the Soviet Union advocating the global spread of communism, particularly in developing nations. This started a socio-political rivalry over the course of four decades; the United States would partake in several military actions often remembered as acts of peacekeeping but included imperialism. This study examines American legal policies during the Cold War in relationship to ideas of US imperialism. Utilizing an approach and encompassing mixed methods that includes archival analysis and ethnography, this study intends to examine US military action in the context of newfound superpower status, specifically how these actions and interventions may or may not have been the result of modern-day imperialism, rather than widely believed attempts to support peace efforts.

Kristal Orta Martinez

Kristal Orta Martinez

“Investigating Disparities in Service, Education, and Healthcare Impacting Latinx Autistic Communities”

For many years, Autism research has focused on developing a cure with hopes to eradicate the condition. Today, more research is being conducted on how to best support Autistic individuals, more specifically toward independent living and higher education. Although research has found disparities regarding support like services, education, and healthcare within the Latinx Autism community (Zuckerman, 2017), minimal research has examined the reasons that have led to these disparities (Liptack, 2018). Given the gap in the literature, this exploratory study is guided by the following question: What are some of the elements (e.g. lack of information regarding Autism, access to health care, etc.) that cause disparities faced by Latinx Autistic children? This study has uncovered that cultural, economic, and racial disadvantages are in place that impede Latinx families from receiving government and state services, equal education rights, and healthcare benefits. This study utilizes semi-structured interviews with parents of Autistic children to unearth which sector they have experienced the most difficulty with when searching for support for their child(ren), as well as to understand why these disparities exist. The reason for this research is to reveal the important points that are likely to contribute to disparities to access. By illuminating specific environments or institutions that contribute to disparities in access, they can then be addressed and remedied.

Rogelio Bazan-Flores

Rogelio Bazan-Flores

“Addressing the Institutional Detriments of Health and its Effects on Minority Health Professionals When Dealing with Medical ‘Burnout’”

With increasing trends of social minority groups going into medical school, there has been an increase to the diversity of medical staff in the field. This research will focus on the institutional determinants of health, while exploring peripheral generational trauma and the effects it has on medical practitioners of color. The literature shows a lack of conversation around minority health professional burnout and the rising diversity in medical teams however, a consideration of these elements is necessary, as a more ethnically diverse medical team will be more culturally competent, bettering health outcomes for the diverse population demographics in cities like Los Angeles. Using the theoretical framework of Peripheral Generational Trauma-Race Consciousness, I propose to investigate the experiences of minority healthcare providers by attaining their insight on burnout and treatment for historically disenfranchised populations. Specifically, this research brings the academic dialogue around cultural consciousness and susceptible minority communities to implementation on what can be done to better support our practitioners of color. Further implications would allow one to explore to what extent does our medical institution support our practitioners of color and how does this translate to the quality of care communities of color engage with at large?

Rosamari Orduna

Rosamari Orduna

“Revisiting Morphology of Ocean Sunfish & Phylogenetic Placement”

Ocean sunfishes (Molidae) have a convoluted taxonomic history, which has made it difficult to assign species identifications to individuals. Significant progress has been made in recent years to assign discrete morphological characters to species, however, establishing taxonomically informative morphological species characteristics has proved challenging. A recent study re-described the molid Mola alexandrini (senior synonym for Mola ramsayi) and assigned this species the common name “bump-head sunfish” (Sawai et al., 2018). Emphasis on the bump-head trait may be problematic, as a population of molids off the coast of Ceuta, Spain possesses both the M. alexandrini-associated bump-head, and a trait associated with M. mola (a wavy clavus). To resolve the taxonomic enigma and determine the genetic species clade, the hypervariable mitochondrial d-loop region was sequenced, and a phylogenetic analysis was conducted on a population of molids from Ceuta, Spain. Spanish molids bearing both a bump-head characteristic and a wavy clavus clustered into d-loop species clade B, which is associated with M. mola. Given that species common names are known to impact monitoring efforts, our finding suggests that the association between the bump-head trait and M. alexandrini should be revisited. The genetic analysis conducted will also allow for the exploration of other research questions that will look for distinctions between the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins and will expectantly provide insight on migration of ocean sunfish.

Julio Mena Bernal

Julio Mena Bernal

“Understanding Existing Mental Health Disparities within Latinx Students and its intersection with COVID-19”

Latinx students suffer high levels of anxiety, depression, isolation, and stress on campus and experience greater psychological distress compared to their white counterparts (Del Pilar, 2009). Additionally, the stress Latinx students face in college affects their academic adjustment and participation within the university (Del Pilar, 2009). Currently, Covid-19 has forced the closure of higher education institutions and affected the educational experience of all students. The pandemic has affected the mental well-being of students through sudden changes in learning, employment, and the uncertainty of their future. However, Latinx students are subject to additional social, economic, and mental health issues affecting their educational experience. This study explored the ways in which COVID-19 has affected the social, economic, and mental well-being of Latinx students. In relation, this project aims to understand the mental health disparities Latinx students have faced prior to the pandemic and how the pandemic has affected their day to day lives to address the needs of Latinx students from higher education institutions. Surveys and interviews were collected to recruit and to understand the barriers and facilitators towards the utilization of mental health resources within an R1 institution and further explore COVID-19’s impact on Latinx students. Project implications include advocating for additional support from higher education institutions towards students of color to address the disparities in educational equity.

Jazmin Perez

Jazmin Perez

“English-Learner and Non-English Learner Postsecondary School Enrollment Rates In Select California High Schools”

While English Language Development (ELD) programs are designed to facilitate linguistic development for emerging English Learners (EL students), there is growing research that has critiqued ESL programs for placing limitations on the academic trajectories of ELD public-school students (Núñez et al., 2016). Currently, there is minimal research that compares the impact of ELD programs in varying school types. Although private schools are not required to provide ELD services, students generally fare better in standardized testing and produce higher postsecondary school enrollment rates than their public-school peers (Hanna, 2017; Council for American Private Education, 2015, 2018). Additionally, EL students in charter schools have shown to have greater academic growth than their public school counterparts (Rapa et al., 2018; Setren, 2020). Therefore, it is essential to know if school type influences EL student’s post-secondary achievements. This project will examine higher education enrollment rates between select California high schools. Data collection will consist of California’s Department of Education publicly accessible records. I hypothesize that EL students who attended private and charter high schools will have greater postsecondary school enrollment rates if their experiences are comparable to those of their non-EL peers. As bi/multilingualism continues to rise and education remains a crucial source for social mobility, it is imperative ESL programs in a wide range of educational settings are further studied to alleviate academic disparities in college and increase opportunities for this marginalized community.

Eugene McAdoo

Eugene McAdoo

“Taking Flight from the Burning House: Exploring Antiblackness and Educational Fugitivity in the Experiences of Black Participants of a Social Justice College Access Program”

Antiblackness -- the disdain, disgust, and disregard for Blackness reflected in civil society’s unwillingness and seeming inability to recognize the humanity of Black people -- permeates the everyday schooling experiences of Black students. In the nearly three-quarters of a century following the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board US Supreme Court decision that declared school segregation as unconstitutional, Black students’ educational experiences continue to be shaped by the pernicious antiblack logic that defined their schooling experiences prior to the Brown decision, thus significantly contributing to their continued marginalization in schools today. In spite of incessant antiblackness, a critical amount of Black students experience academic success at the secondary level and successfully matriculate into college, highlighting a need for researchers to study the factors that enable Black students to overcome obstacles posed by antiblackness. Utilizing Black Critical Theory (BlackCrit) and kihana ross’ afterlife of school segregation and Black educational fugitive space as analytical lenses, this study seeks to explore how Black students experience antiblackness in their everyday schooling experiences, in addition to examining how Black students are empowered to challenge and resist antiblackness through their participation in a Social Justice College Access Program. Given that antiblackness is endemic to the schooling experiences of Black students, it is imperative for researchers to explore how Black students both experience and resist antiblackness in schools in order to improve their holistic wellbeing and academic outcomes.

Brian Zamora

Brian Zamora

“Indigenous in Me: Exploring Nemachtili in Freirean and Critical Indigenous Methodologies”

The salience of racialized identities across education research often unintentionally minimizes the role of capitalist social relations within racialized groups’ social and material conditions. There is need for a research inquiry that questions how learning systems under the profit motive alienate or further the localized knowledge funds in urbanized settings. Within Chicano education research, seldom emphasis is placed on learning spaces conducive to communities beyond the academic periphery. I propose nemachtili (the spirit of learning) as a methodology that sustains a critical Indigenous approach nested in the Freirean tradition to analyze subjectivities immediate to Chicanos. I raise the following questions: How does nemachtili encompass a Freirean and critical Indigenous methodology to address learning spaces? How is nemachtili articulated in an online learning space? This study engages nemachtili through a critical case study of an online course for Chicano youth as a research approach responsive to the racialized settings that Chicanos inhabit.